Archive for the ‘DAT’ Category

When Can I Take The DAT (Dental Admissions Test)?

August 16, 2008

Now that the DAT is taken as an electronic exam, you are free to take the exam whenever you like. All you need to do is contact a pro-metric testing site and schedule an exam. There are hundreds of sites throughout the United States. For more information visit the ADA website.

How Important Is My DAT Score?

June 22, 2008

The importance of your DAT (Dental admission Test) is going to be relative to the schools to which you apply. Take a look at your intended school’s average DAT scores in the past few years. You can find this information in the ADEA Official Guide to Dental Schools.

There are a number of study guides for the DAT, including the Kaplan DAT with CD-ROM, 2007-2008 Edition. While Kaplan is probably the most well known, there are a number of other very good study guides. Barron’s How to Prepare for the Dental Admissions Test is also quite good.

During my own preparation for the DAT I was very satisfied with TopScore Pro for the DAT. It contained 3 complete exams that are in the exact format of the DAT. It appeared just as if you were taking the exam, except it includes a small timer in the corner to let you know how your pace is doing compared to where you should be in the exam. With that timer you are aware if you are ahead or behind in your timing.

I might also suggest taking a look at the How To Ace Your DAT blog. You can find some good tips there to help you improve your score.

Should I Retake The DAT?

December 4, 2006


This question is often found in the forums. To be quite honest, it’s not a question that can be easily answered.

There is no limit to the number of times that you can take the DAT (Dental Admissions Test). When you go to a testing center and take the DAT you must designate at least one school for the test score to whom the test score will be released. After you finish the exam and receive your score, the most recent 4 scores will be sent to the schools that you designate.

Because of this it is important to realize that the schools will see the last 4 exams, so be prepared to answer questions during your interview if you retake the exam and end up with a lower score than you had on a previous test.

I think you must first take an objective look at your scores and ask yourself if your scores are competitive with scores for the schools that you are applying. Remember, when you look at a schools numbers and see that their DAT academic average is 18.5, that means that some students were higher, some were lower, but in general if you have that score you will be competitive with other students who are applying to that University. Well, at least with respect to DAT score.

The next thing to think about is what have you done to improve your chances of receiving a higher score? There are a number of study guides for the DAT, including the Kaplan DAT with CD-ROM, 2007-2008 Edition. While Kaplan is probably the most well known, there are a number of other very good study guides. Barron’s How to Prepare for the Dental Admissions Test is also quite good. The item I found to be absolutely indespensible for my preparation for the DAT was TopScore Pro for the DAT software from Scholarware. It contained 3 complete exams that are in the exact format of the DAT.

My best advice is for you to call the school that you are interested in and ask to speak to someone in admissions regarding your score. Many students are reluctant to call the institutions that they are planning to attend. Don’t be! Each school is the best source for information with regard to that school.

The DAT, Dental Admissions Test

December 2, 2006

If you’re planning on getting into a career in dentistry, you’re going to need to take the American Dental Association (ADA) Dental Admissions Test (DAT). You should take the exam during the Spring of your junior year (undergraduate) up to the Fall of your Senior year. However, with the increasing competitiveness of Dental School admission and the importance on applying early it is recommended that you take it as soon as possible.

The DAT is a standardized test that is designed to measure general academic ability, science background, and perceptual ability. The test consists of 4 sections; Natural Sciences, Reading Comprehension, Quantitative Reasoning, and Perceptual Ablity.

From this writer’s perspective, the singe greatest tool I had when preparing to take the DAT was a copy of the Dental Admission Test (DAT) Computerized Sample Tests and Guide, TopScore Pro for the DAT. This software is identical to the testing situation that you will have when you take the computerized DAT at one of the authorized testing centers. It contained 3 complete practice tests that are in the exact format of the actual test. The only difference I noticed from the actual DAT and this software was the software included a timer at the top of the screen to let you know how your pace was compared to where you should be. For example, if you were on question 17 of the reading comp test it would tell you that you should be on question 15, letting you know that you are ahead of the pace.

My actual DAT scores were almost identical to my practice scores. I found the Dental Admission Test (DAT) Computerized Sample Tests and Guide, TopScore Pro for the DAT to be an outstanding tool.

As of August 2008 the cost to take the exam is $190.00

When you take the exam you will have 4 hours and 15 minutes to complete the four tests.

Survey of Natural Sciences – 90 Minutes
Biology – 40 Questions
General Chemistry – 30 questions
Organic Chemistry – 30 Questions

Perceptual Ability – 60 Minutes
Angle Discrimination – 15 Questions
Hole Punching – 15 Questions
Cubes – 15 Questions
Paper Folding – 15 Questions
Aperture Matching – 15 Questions
Orthographic Projections – 15 Questions

Break – 15 Minutes

Reading Comprehension – 50 Minutes
Three Passages – 50 Questions

Quantitative Reasoning – 45 Minutes
Applied Mathematics Problems:
Algebra, Trigonometry, Math Reasoning (word problems) – 40 Questions

DAT Scores
Now that the DAT is administered in testing centers on computers, you will get your DAT Score as soon as you finish the exam.

Your raw score on each of the eight subsections will be converted to a scaled score from 1 to 30, with 30 being a perfect score, 15 being the median score and representing the 40-52 percentile.

Each subsection will have it’s own score, but the scores will be combined in areas and you will get an Academic Average (AA) score. This is generally the score that you will see listed when checking your competitiveness for a particular school.

For more Information visit the ADA Website